What is a Minnesota Certified Florist?

It’s a fact that in the state of Minnesota, there are no licenses, state boards, or any other proficiency measures required to open a floral shop. Anyone with a desire to call themselves a florist can hang up their shingle and start doing business. How do customers know (without trying and getting burned a couple of times) whether the florist they’re patronizing knows anything about what they’re doing?

For this reason, the Minnesota State Florists Association adopted the Professional Certified Florists’ Program, one of the most complete educational programs in the floral industry, so that florists who wanted to be able to distinguish themselves as being both respected and knowledgeable could voluntarily achieve this designation. The Professional Certified Florist Program provides a standard of professional excellence which is recognized throughout the industry.

Annette Hentz, owner of Carver Flowers, became a Certified Florist in 2012.  That means she had to demonstrate her knowledge and expertise in not only the principles of floral design (for sympathy, wedding and everyday), but also in flower & plant care & handling, daily shop management (including marketing, visual merchandising and delivery) and employee & customer relations. Not only is she a Minnesota Certified Florist, but because Minnesota uses the nationally recognized program curriculum, she’s certified in any state in which she may like to do business.

No other florist in the Southwest Metro area has sought and achieved this distinction. Wouldn’t you prefer to do business with a Minnesota Certified Florist?

Our Story

For nearly as long as Al & Annette Hentz have lived in Carver, they’ve dreamed of opening a flower shop in town. Annette has retailing in her blood; her mother single-handedly ran Isaacson’s General Store in rural Embarrass, Minnesota for sixteen years while Annette was growing up. Al used to work in his cousin’s flower shop in New Jersey when he was a teenager. Their yard in Carver Bluffs is full of flowers from early spring to late fall, evidence  that Annette has been an avid gardener for 15 years.

So what held them back from their dream? Well, they both worked full-time – Al in Minnetonka and Annette in downtown Minneapolis – and the switch from long-time careers with substantial benefits to a fledgling enterprise in a small but growing town was a scary one. So they started small, opening Carver Country Flowers & Gifts on March 15, 2008 with very limited hours.

Since January, 2009, Carver Flowers (renamed in 2014) has become a full-time, full-service floral studio located inside our 145-year old historic building in downtown Carver. In our retail space you'll find loose flowers and arrangements in the cooler, flowering and green plants in the flower cart, silk floral wreaths on the walls, greeting cards on the rack, candles in the cupboards and other unique vintage/cottage home decor and gift items on display. Annette makes up floral arrangements to order, including wedding and sympathy designs. Floral orders can be placed in person, by calling 952-448-0078, or by e-mailing carverflowers@gmail.com.  

We look forward to meeting you and serving your floral and gift needs. 

We Gave Ourselves a Face Lift!

    Take a look at the BEFORE and AFTER!

Carver Flowers Store Before and After

Stop (or drive) by and take a look. If you like what you see, let us know or toot your horn!

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Above left - Our winning entry in the Nature Photography category of SW Metro Magazine's 2010 Photo Contest

Article reads:

Photographer Annette Hentz discovers a bird nest in the most unusual place.

ANNETTE HENTZ SNAPPED THIS SHOT IN SPRING 2008 behind Carver Country Flowers & Gifts, a shop she owns in downtown Carver. When the photo was taken, there was a kind of "catch-all" on the side of the flower and gift shop, a place full of rusting antiques and odds and ends. One day, she stumbled upon the robin's nest built in an abandoned cupboard and visited it frequently after she made the discovery.

Using her digital SLR camera, a telephoto lens and a tripod, she was able to capture a quintessential image of spring. "As soon as they heard a noise, even me creeping up to them, they thought it was Mom coming with food and those mouths flew open," Hentz says. The voracity of the baby birds and their insatiable appetite is what she initially liked about the picture. At the time, she wished she had something to actually feed them.

Hentz took up photography in 2000 without any formal training. With a simple one mega-pixel digital camera and an instructional book, she began taking pictures of the flowers in her garden and gradually improved from there. "I figured out quickly that only about 20% of photography is the camera, if that," Hentz says. "The rest is the photographer's eye."

(The contest photo is reminiscent of another photo I took a year earlier, that of the wild pasque flowers, above right, that bloom in early spring in the Minnesota Valley Wildlife Preserve behind our house.)

Click here for more of our photography.